Posts Tagged ‘W. Hotel’

Sexy W Hotel Hangers

May 19, 2009

I totally want to stay at one of the W Hotels in New York. Or Vegas. Or…

W Hotel Hangers

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Did someone say in-room couple’s massage?

April 9, 2009

I’m on the lookout for a NYC hotel to have a hot date with my guy. We’ll be booking it soon, but this deal from the W Hotel caught my eye:

W has so many sensations to tempt the two of you, even if you never leave your room! Just ring Whatever/Whenever® for in-room couple’s massages, a romantic dinner brought right to your door, wuv potion cocktails and beyond. Looking for something really risqué? If staying in NY, take advantage of an exclusive W offer for a custom portrait by NY Magazine’s “Best Nude Photographer,” Brian Leighton.

The idea of both of us getting a massage that leaves us totally liquid and melty and unable to move from our bed, then the person leaving us to go at it sounds…perfect!

Free treats for Hoboken commuters from W Hotel (opening March 27th)

March 9, 2009

from NJ.com:

In a hotel promotion, folks from W Talent will be handing out goodie bags to commuters during the morning and evening rush hours — 7:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.

Among the treats are breath mints — for that morning coffee breath! — towelettes, a W Hoboken bookmark, assorted goodies from bliss Spa at W Hoboken and an exclusive offer from Zylo restaurant.

Also included in the goodie bag will be a mini telescope — “to keep an eye on W Hoboken from Manhattan,” according to a news release. And we all know that mini telescope will be the most useful because the W Hoboken has been known to sneak out behind all our backs while we’re at work.

Click here for the hotel’s website (it opens March 27th).

All about the do not disturb sign

February 4, 2009

A whole article about the history of the do not disturb sign, by David A. Keeps in the June 2005 issue of Travel & Leisure:

With the rise of boutique hotels in the nineties, even the most inconsequential items—notepads, laundry bags—bore the imprint of a brand-savvy graphic design team, and the Do Not Disturb sign went from dull to desirable again. It was the first W, in New York, that revived my itchy fingers. The property’s die-cut door hanger read Go Away, Please, communicating in no uncertain terms the core values of what hotels provide: privacy and anonymity for an increasingly stressed-out populace. “Everybody is looking for a way to say they’re not available,” says Ross Klein, senior vice president and chief marketing officer of W Hotels Worldwide.

Though it was recently retired, the Go Away sign lives on; Klein estimates that more than 10,000 of them checked out along with the luggage. W’s next model—When? Not Quite—debuts this summer. Klein ordered three times more than he needed, in anticipation of souvenir hunters. “We don’t consider it theft,” he says. “We believe the signs are being adopted into loving homes.”

As a foster parent for hotel paraphernalia, I welcome the return of this cultural artifact—whether it’s the embroidered pillows that hang from the knobs at Maryland’s Inn at Perry Cabin or the clever magnetic Do Not Disturb disc that sticks to the metal door at the Maritime in New York (yes, it’s on my refrigerator now). Others are as in-your-face as a subway ride: Manhattan’s Le Parker Meridien borrowed the quintessential New York phrase Fuhgettaboudit. Kimpton Hotels has developed unique messages for each of its properties, from the jazz-centric Allegro in Chicago (Composing a Classic) to Washington, D.C.’s Pop art–styled Helix (Too Fabulous to Be Disturbed).

The trendy Do Not Disturb sign can have its drawbacks, however, at least according to Jason Pomeranc, co-owner of Thompson Hotels, which encompasses New York’s 60 Thompson, the Hollywood Roosevelt, and the Sagamore in Miami Beach. The cardboard sign he created—which simply says Do Not Disturb—delighted two of his guests so much that they eschewed privacy, putting it in their suitcase instead of on their door. “I walked into a room I thought was empty, only to find the couple still in bed,” Pomeranc recalls.

Own your own W Hotel bed

February 4, 2009

I love, even though it’s beyond ridiculous, that you can buy a W Hotel bed to use at home. For the bargain price of $1,265! I haven’t bought a mattress in ages, but I really think I’d rather blow that kind of cash on several luxurious hotel nights, you know?

Give a lapdance at the W

January 13, 2009

W Hotels are offering Sheila Kelley’s S Factor classes: register here.

WHY NOT DISCOVER YOUR S FACTOR?

WHO

W Hotels and you

WHAT

Where can you show off your girl power? Discover the flirtiest way to get fit with S Factor. Join us for an a signature S Factor Lapdance Class and learn moves to move your partner while getting in shape. The hour and a half class includes expert direction from an S Factor instructor and a goodie bag to enjoy at home.

Join us for this exciting series on the following dates: January 16, 23, and 30; February 6 and 13

WHEN

January 16, 06:00 PM – February 13, 08:00 PM

WHERE

W Chicago – City Center, Workroom

172 West Adams Street

Chicago , IL 60603-3604

W Hotels get sexed up by Clodagh

January 5, 2009

from Wallpaper, which also has a slideshow (via Planet Pink n Green)

People have more sex in hotel rooms than anywhere else, posits Manhattan interior designer Clodagh, so it makes sense to design with sex in mind. For one of her latest projects, the W Fort Lauderdale, she positioned the beds for a positive feng shui effect and added a strip of light nearby for subtle night-time illumination. The strip is gelled for a soft, flattering glow so that, as she quips, ‘everyone can look absolutely fantastic even if they don’t have a great tan.’

Her design brief was simple. W wanted an ‘urban resort’, a luxury hotel which epitomised the designer brand but spoke to the stunning beachside location. For Clodagh that meant comfort, style, and fun. ‘I think life should be a joy,’ she says, ‘and when you travel you want to have fun.’

As a jury member of Material ConneXion, a resource centre for new and advanced materials, Clodagh was eager to incorporate some of the latest offerings into the Fort Lauderdale project – things like foam aluminums, unique microfibres, resins, and concrete embedded with lenticular mirrors.